Posts Tagged “Ubuntu”

Ubuntu GIS from Scratch: Step Six – QGIS

Welcome to Step Six in our exploration of open source GIS using Ubuntu. In the previous installments, we uploaded some spatial data into a PostGIS database, and experimented with spatial SQL. Finally, we’re ready to install QGIS, the most popular open source GIS desktop available. QGIS is a lot like ESRI’s ArcMap, in that it [...]

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Ubuntu GIS from Scratch: Step 5 – Spatial SQL

Welcome to Step Five in our exploration of open source GIS using Ubuntu. In the previous installment, we uploaded some spatial data into a PostGIS. database. The next logical step is to install QGIS and add start visually analyzing this data, which we’ll get to in Step Six. But before that, I wanted to take [...]

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Ubuntu GIS from Scratch: Step 4 – Loading Data.

(Note – this post was updated on October 28 to include new information!) Welcome to Step Four in our exploration of open source GIS using Ubuntu. In the previous installment, we spatially extended our PostgreSQL database server with PostGIS. Now we’re ready to load some geographical data into our database. PostGIS includes a tool called [...]

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Ubuntu GIS from Scratch: Step 3 – PostGIS

Welcome to Step Three in our exploration of open source GIS using Ubuntu. In order to grasp the full power of GIS, we need to spatially extend our database (PostgreSQL, which was installed in the first step). The spatial extension for PostgreSQL is PostGIS. In the second step, we installed GEOS and GDAL, two major [...]

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Ubuntu GIS from Scratch: Step 2 – GEOS and GDAL

Welcome to Step Two in our exploration of open source GIS using Ubuntu. In order to grasp the full power of GIS, we need to spatially extend our database (PostgreSQL, which was installed in the previous step). The spatial extension for PostgreSQL is PostGIS, which we will eventually be installing. But before we can get [...]

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Ubuntu GIS from Scratch: Step 1 – PostgreSQL

After a recent hard drive crash, I decided to try out Ubuntu, the most popular consumer Linux distribution. Ubuntu has become popular because it is more lenient than other distributions with regard to proprietary software – it can use Flash and play mp3s out of the box, without installing additional software. Ubuntu, like other Linux [...]

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